Maple syrup farmers

Farmer Feature: Jim Adamski

When we interviewed Jim Adamski for this week’s farmer feature, we discovered that he got his start in maple syrup production as a 4-H project in 1984. With the help of his family, the operation has been growing ever since. Keep reading to find out what inspires him, how he views his role in the greater community, and a few other insights into his life as a sugarmaker.

The Adamski Sugarmaker Team

Tell us about yourself and your sugarbush.

My name is Jim Adamski and I am one of the owners of Adamski’s Sugar Bush LLC. We started in 1984 as a hobby operation with 25 taps and a small flat pan. Over the years we have purchased several different wood lots for syrup production and we also purchase sap from two certified organic sap producers. We currently process sap from approximately 13,000 taps.

How much maple syrup do you produce annually?

We produce between 5000 to 6000 gallons of syrup per year.

What did you want to be when you were growing up?

A farmer.

How did you first get started in maple syrup production? How long have you been making maple syrup?

Syrup production started out as a 4-H and FFA project when I was in high school. The first year of production was 1984.

Loading the Sap

What is your favorite part of the process?

Tapping. It marks the start of the season that you have been waiting 10 or more months to begin.

Does anyone help out?

My mom and dad are involved with the business, along with my wife and my son.

What inspires you?

The satisfied customers who purchase our maple products and return time and time again.

What does organic mean to you? Why do you choose to farm organically?

Having the ability to produce a crop sustainably for generations without any man-made inputs. I want to pass the land to the next generation in better shape than I received it.

Tapping a Tree

What has been your greatest challenge as a maple farmer?

Finding the time to market all of our maple products.

How do you view your role in your local community and on a grander scale?

We sponsor several 4-H and faith-based organizations in our community. Our business is a member of the Wisconsin Maple Syrup Producers Association and I am the voting delegate from Wisconsin for the North American Maple Syrup Council.

What is your favorite way to eat maple syrup? Do you have a favorite recipe?

Pancakes of course. The favorite recipe would be Maple Sugar Pie.

Which do you prefer, Dark or Amber?

Amber.

What do you hope to see for yourself and your farm in the future?

We look to grow our acreage and our tap numbers as the market continues to grow.

Snowshoeing

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